Projectyle (Electronic Arts) Review | Computer & Video Games - Everygamegoing

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Projectyle
By Electronic Arts
Atari ST

 
Published in Computer & Video Games #104

Projectyle

Sports of the future won't be played on boring old surfaces like grass - each team will be able to choose their own playing surface according to their strengths.

Projectyle features eight such teams, each with their own pitch - these range from the ridiculously fast (owned by the Manic Mooses) to the slow, crazy, spotted surface used by the Eldritch Cats. Each pitch is divided up into five areas: there's a central zone with no goalmouths, three defence zones and a 'frantic' zone where there are three goalmouths and everyone has an equal chance of scoring.

The objective, obviously, is to score as many goals as possible within the three-set time limit. But here's the novel twist: unlike most sports, Projectyle features three teams competing for the ball (the 'projectyle') at the same time. The team scoring most receives eight points, the second team four, and the third gets zilch.

Atari ST

Projectyle's presentation is probably the most polished you'll find in any future sport. Apart from the full league and cup system (with up to eight human players taking part and a save/load facility), there's a host of redefinable player parameters and the ability to train and deplot team members in any position.

All eight pitch designs are brilliant, from a silly jelly pitch to a bubbling chocolate and lava pitch - they're colourful, imaginative and feature smooth four-way parallax scrolling, in-game presentation features include an optional action replay sequence and a practice mode (you can switch off computer intelligence).

As if that wasn't enough, there's also a leading scorers table! The gameplay itself is fast and furious - a bit like air hockey played on five pitches instead of one.

You might think at first that it's all mindless rushing around after the projectyle, but it only takes a few games to appreciate the strategic elements. This is a beautifully designed, colourful and extremely fast future sport - one that's going to take some beating.

Gordon Houghton